Kimberly Servello's Embroidery Blog

Kimberly Servello - Pattern Drawer and Embroideress

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Openwork Insertion Seams - Work On The Scarf Continues




I've completed the insertion seams.  The Spring green color I worked them in helps to make the seams pop.


I haven't found much information on how to work these seams.  In fact, the only sources I found are a few diagrams and photographs in  Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion 4, and some instructions in T. de Dillmont's Encyclopedia of Needlework.  If anyone knows of another source, please contact me.




I chose a seam which was both diagramed in Arnold's book, and included in de Dillmont's...


from Patterns of Fashion 4 by J. Arnold
from Complete Encyclopedia of Needlework by T. deDillmont

















It consists of groups of 3 Buttonhole stitches, with the center stitch about twice the length of the 2 outer stitches.  Therese deDillmont's instructions state that both pieces of linen should be lying flat while the seam is stitched.  I found this uncomfortable and in the end I folded the 2 pieces of linen at the area of the seam and stitched them like that.  After ironing the seam it lays flat and doesn't appear to look any different for having been stitched at a different angle.  It was quite fun to work.  If you like hemming by hand, you'll enjoy doing this.













Here you can see the seam in process.  The 2 pieces of linen to be seamed have been placed together with wrong sides facing each other.  Pick a side to start with and begin the buttonhole stitches.


The needle pierces one piece of linen at a time.  So, in this step the needle pierces the top piece of linen only.







The first buttonhole stitch is complete.


















The second buttonhole is about twice
 the length of the first.

















The third buttonhole is the same
length as the first.

Next, complete the same sequence of buttonholes on the second piece of linen.


 I turned the piece in my hands so that the side I was working on was facing me each time.  The thread is run back and forth between the 2 pieces of linen to work groups of buttonholes first on one piece, then on the other.  It's the thread connecting the groups of 3 that actually holds the 2 pieces together.


The fringes on the scarf need to be completed yet.  I ran out of floss and am awaiting my package in the mail.  As soon as the fringes are complete, I will post a pic of the finished scarf.

20 comments:

  1. Mary Thomas's Embroidery Book calls the process "faggoting" so I just googled faggoting and found some information - maybe some would be of interest.
    Regards, Lynn

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the tip. I added Elizabethan to the search term, since I want only 16th / 17th century info, and I found a couple blogs with info on them.

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  2. Wow, this is beautiful, what a lovely technique

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  3. My copy of Mary Thomas's Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches has an entire section on insertion stitches...

    It's looking very good!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's a book I don't have! I guess I need to check into it....

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    2. Rachel,

      Thank you for the information!

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  4. Well, I know who I'll talk to if I ever construct something! I'll have a look and see if I have any books with insertion seams (embarrased - I have Mary Thomas)

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    Replies
    1. This is one those stitches you can do when you don't want to have to think too hard.

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    2. Sounds like my kind of thing!

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  5. Effie Mitrofanis' book Casalguidi Style Linen Embroidery has instructions on insertion stitches.

    Celeste

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  6. This is beautiful... thanks for the info. I can see it being used to great effect on a linen jacket, also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, they definitely used them to sew some jacket seams.

      As I made this scarf, I could picture a sort of ultra-fine crazy quilt with many different insertion seams piecing together various colors of fine linens.

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  7. Have you checked the antiquepatternlibrary.com? it is free and lots of patterns to choose from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really like that site, but had forgotten about it. Thanks for the reminder!

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  8. This is wonderful. Thank you for sharing. I've heard of this and long wanted good photos of a close up example. :)

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  9. Bonjour Kimberly,
    En cherchant des explications sur ce sujet je suis arrivée chez vous mais j'ai aussi trouvé d'autres assemblages ici:
    http://www.textile-creation-club.com/fr/ameublement/Nappes.htm
    En espérant que cela puisse vous être utile

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bonjour Lillyblanc,

      Je vous remercie! Il existe plusieurs variantes que je n'ai pas vus auparavant. Aussi, quelle belle idée de les utiliser pour une nappe!

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  10. This is great . I have no problem understanding and I am looking forward to doing it I found a sample on Pinterest and while looking for something different.
    Katherine O'Rourke from Spring Texas

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